Mar 03, 2024  
2023-2024 Catalog and Student Handbook Spring 2024 
    
2023-2024 Catalog and Student Handbook Spring 2024

Academic Information



South Piedmont Community College operates on the semester system. The fall and spring semesters are each 16 weeks and may include two (2) or more shorter sessions. The summer term is eight (8) weeks and may contain two (2) or more shorter sessions.

Student Classification

  • Full-time curriculum students are enrolled in 12 or more semester hours of credit.
  • Part-time curriculum students are enrolled with fewer than 12 semester hours of credit.
  • Non-degree seeking (special credit) students are enrolled in individual credit courses but not working toward credential completion.

Academic Credit Hours

Semester hours are awarded as follows:

  • One semester hour of credit for each hour per week of class lecture
  • One semester hour of credit for each two (2) or three (3) hours per week of laboratory or shop
  • One semester hour of credit for each three (3) hours per week of clinical
  • One semester hour of credit for each 10 hours per week of cooperative work experience

Student Course Load

Students must carry 12 credit hours to be considered a full-time student. Permission from the dean within the educational division must be obtained to schedule more than 20 credit hours in one semester. Permission can be granted via the Credit Hour Overload Request found in Student Forms.

The decision about the best course load in fall or spring semesters or summer term depends on the amount of time available to students to complete academic work in addition to other responsibilities. College coursework requires more than just the time to attend class. Students need to allow time for reading, studying, assignments, research, projects, etc. Plan to devote two (2) to three (3) hours outside of class for every hour that the course meets. For example, if the course is a three (3) contact hour course (meets three (3) hours per week), plan to devote six (6) to nine (9) hours outside the classroom.

eLearning

eLearning at South Piedmont Community College champions learning technologies to support engagement, inclusiveness, and universally accessible courses. eLearning offers different delivery methods and modalities, such as online, blended, HyFlex, interactive television, and traditional on-campus courses.

Online (Internet) courses offer students time and location flexibility in accessing learning materials, assessments and other various class activities. All online courses at South Piedmont follow schedules and deadlines to ensure each student’s academic success. Online courses are offered as part of the SPCC regular class schedule, with published start and end dates. Section numbers for courses conducted fully online begin with “O.”

Blended courses combine online learning with required, scheduled, face-to-face instructional time on campus. The required face-to-face and online hours may vary from course to course. The online portion replaces in classroom instructional time with learning activities and assessments to be completed in Canvas. Students must attend all scheduled classes just as any other traditional college course. Section numbers for blended courses have an “A” or “S” in the second field.

Traditional courses are regular, face-to-face classroom courses on campus that use an online course site to supplement instruction. Instructors will post the course syllabus there along with other course materials. The online grade book may be used to help keep students up-to-date on their grades. Or, they may require submission of assignments electronically in the course’s online site. Some others may do all course testing on the course site. All of SPCC’s seated courses on campus are now web-enhanced. Students will be required to submit at least one assignment by going to the course’s online site. Section numbers for traditional classes have a “C” in the second field.

HyFlex or Hybrid-Flexible is a course model that presents the components of hybrid learning in a flexible course structure. It offers students the option of attending sessions in the classroom, participating online or doing both. Students can change their mode of attendance weekly or by topic, according to need or preference. A HyFlex model offers multiple paths through course content, which supports students with various levels of expertise, background, or learning styles in achieving the course competencies. Section numbers for HyFlex classes have an “F” in the second field.

Interactive Television (ITV) courses have two-way interactive video technology that connects teaching locations among SPCC campuses and throughout the state. ITV enables the course instructor and students in the classroom at one location to see, hear, and talk to students in comparably-equipped classrooms at other locations. There are ITV classrooms on the L. L. Polk campus in Polkton, the Old Charlotte Highway campus in Monroe, and the Lockhart-Taylor Center in Wadesboro. These courses are taught by SPCC instructors and section numbers end with a “V.”

To log into Canvas, students should go to www.spcc.edu and select “Student Panel” on the upper right side of the screen, select “Canvas,” and login using their SPCC username and password. New students will go to SPCC Go! to activate their accounts.

Registration for eLearning courses is handled in the same way as traditional course registration. Credit hours earned for taking these courses are the same as those earned for taking the same courses in a traditional classroom setting. The cost for distance learning is the same as for traditionally scheduled courses.

Students participating in distance learning courses must:

  • Complete the admissions process, including placement testing if needed
  • Meet required prerequisites and/or corequisites listed for the course in the College catalog
  • Possess the necessary skills and technical requirements needed to participate in distance learning courses
  • Complete all assigned coursework, discussions/chats, and assessments within the time constraints defined by the instructor
  • Access online and blended courses using the Internet, and complete requirements on or before the last published access date

Fully online courses. Although, eLearning courses are inclusive and accommodate a great variety of learning styles, fully online courses require great responsibility, commitment, self-motivation, and discipline. Students will need to commit an average of 12 to 15 hours every week to course work, which includes readings, videos, interactive and collaborative assignments, among others. eLearning students need to have access to the necessary equipment for the course and know how to use it. When taking online and blended courses, access to a computer and a reliable Internet connection is needed. Although computers on campus are connected to the Internet, students must not rely on campus computers as the sole means of accessing their courses.

The college offers the opportunity of using computers with an Internet connection while on campus. Students may check out a laptop (maximum 4 hour periods) from any of the laptop kiosk stations on campus. Additionally, laptops can be checked out for longer periods of time (including the entire semester) from South Piedmont’s libraries. These resources ensure equitable access to computers for online learners. If students are challenged by technology resources, please consult with a Librarian.

Some courses will require specific versions of software packages. If your class is one of those, it will be listed on the course syllabus. The instructor will be able to answer questions about the software. South Piedmont offers students, faculty, and staff free access to Microsoft Office 365, which contains MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, Teams, and more. Student computers must have access to the required software as well as the capability to save documents in a format that the instructor requires.

At a minimum, students using Canvas must be able to:

  • Access and use their SPCC Office 365 email account
  • Open and close a word processing program
  • Enter and edit text
  • Open existing documents
  • Use passwords
  • Protect against computer viruses
  • Open and close a browser
  • Navigate to different websites
  • Create/find/use a bookmark or favorite

Attendance

South Piedmont Community College is an attendance taking college. Regular attendance and participation are essential to student learning and successful completion of a course. The College recognizes that students are adults with many responsibilities and occasional absences are unavoidable. However, absences in no way lessen the student’s responsibility for meeting the requirements of the course.

The College does not differentiate between “excused” and “unexcused” absences in calculating course attendance.

Attendance in Traditional Classes

Traditional courses are seated classes in which students attend on campus or at other designated physical locations. Attendance in traditional courses is defined as physically attending a seated class. Absences are counted from the first official meeting of the course regardless of when the student registers for, or enters, the course.

Students are responsible for all work missed during their absence. Instructors are not required to accept makeup or missed work; therefore, acceptance of makeup or missed work is at the discretion of the instructor.

Attendance may be used as a factor in determining the final grade for a course. This factor must be included in the course syllabus. Instructors are responsible for discussing their syllabus at the first class meeting of each course.

Instructors will withdraw students who violate the instructor’s attendance policy as outlined in the course syllabus. The instructor will submit an Instructor-Initiated Withdrawal Form, and a grade of “WI” (Withdrawal by Instructor) will be assigned.

Punctuality is also essential to student learning. Students are expected to arrive to class meetings on time and to stay for the entire class period. Arriving late or leaving early disrupts the learning environment. Each instructor is responsible for addressing punctuality in the course syllabus.

Attendance in Distance Learning Classes (100 Percent Online)

Distance learning courses are taught completely online. Student attendance in online courses is defined as active participation in the online course.

For the purposes of this policy, attendance at the College includes:

  1. Submitting an academic assignment
  2. Taking or submitting an exam or quiz
  3. Completing an interactive tutorial
  4. Participating in an online study group assigned by faculty/instructor(s)
  5. Participating in an online discussion forum/board assigned by faculty/instructor(s)
  6. Student-initiated documented contact with the faculty member (email from SPCC issued account, virtual meeting, in-person meeting, conference calls) to ask a content-related question(s)

If a student fails to maintain attendance for a period equivalent to two (2) calendar weeks (14 consecutive days) for 10-, 12-, and 16-week classes OR one calendar week (7 consecutive days) for courses lasting eight (8) weeks or less for the semester/term, the instructor will withdraw the student from the course by submitting an Instructor-Initiated Withdrawal Form, and a grade of “WI” (Withdrawal by Instructor) will be assigned.

For any situation that results in the student being unable to log into their online course, the student is responsible for contacting the instructor.

Attendance in Blended/Hybrid/Hyflex Classes

Blended/Hybrid/HyFlex courses have both online and seated class attendance requirements.

For the purposes of this policy, attendance in these courses is defined as active participation in the course.

Attendance includes:

  1. Physically attending a seated class or participating in a virtual synchronous class
  2. Submitting an academic assignment
  3. Taking or submitting an exam or quiz
  4. Completing an interactive tutorial
  5. Participating in an online study group assigned by faculty/instructor(s)
  6. Participating in an online discussion forum/board assigned by faculty/instructor(s)
  7. Student-initiated documented contact with the faculty member (email from SPCC issued account, virtual meeting, in-person meeting, conference calls) to ask a content-related question(s)

If a student fails to maintain attendance for a period equivalent to two (2) calendar weeks (14 consecutive days) for 10-, 12-, and 16-week classes OR one calendar week (7 consecutive days) for courses lasting eight (8) weeks of less for the semester/term, the instructor will withdraw the student from the course by submitting an Instructor-Initiated Withdrawal Form, and a grade of “WI” (Withdrawal by Instructor) will be assigned.

For any situation that results in the student being unable to log into their online course, the student is responsible for contacting the instructor.

For attendance purposes, cameras must remain on for the duration of the class period, when a student is attending via Microsoft Teams or other video conferencing applications. Failure to do so will constitute an absence.

Department Attendance Requirements

A curriculum department may be more stringent in its attendance requirements but cannot be more lenient. If a department decides to have more stringent attendance requirements, then all instructors in the department must incorporate these requirements into their syllabi and advise their students of these requirements at the first class meeting of each course. If an external accrediting agency requires a more stringent attendance policy for a program than the College’s attendance requirements, that requirement will be incorporated into the syllabi. Changes to the College’s attendance requirements must be approved in advance by the Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs/CAO.

Absences for Religious Observances

South Piedmont Community College will authorize two (2) excused absences each semester (fall and spring) for religious observances required by the faith of a student.

SPCC requires that the student provide written notice of the request for an excused absence a minimum of two (2) weeks prior to the date of the religious observance. The student will be given the opportunity to make up any tests or other work missed due to an excused absence for a religious observance. The student must communicate with the instructor in advance of the absence to determine how and when the missed work will be completed. The student should complete the Religious Observance Excused Absence Request form found in Student Forms. If approved, the student should complete the Religious Observance Excused Absence Request Assignments form found in Student Forms.

Census Dates

Entry into classes at SPCC requires students to have physically attended and/or to have logged into their Canvas courses and completed the Start Up Activity in order to be counted for funding purposes. Entry into a course must occur by the census date/10 percent point for the course. Census dates differ depending on the type of course in which the student is registered.

Students who have neither logged into their Canvas course and completed the Start Up Activity by the census date nor attended a seated class meeting or online synchronous meeting by the census date will be considered “Never Attended” and removed from the course.

Traditional or web-enhanced classes: Students must be physically present by the census date/10 percent point for the course. Students who have not attended any class meeting by the census date will be considered “Never Attended” and removed from the course.

Distance learning or online classes: Students must log into Canvas and complete the Start Up Activity by the census date/10 percent point in the course. Students who have not logged into Canvas and completed the Start Up Activity by the census date will be considered “Never Attended” and removed from the course.

Blended classes: Students must log into Canvas and complete the Start Up Activity by the census date/10 percent point in the course or must have physically attended a seated class meeting by the census date/10 percent point in the course. Students who have neither logged into Canvas and completed the Start Up Activity by the census date nor attended a seated class or online synchronous meeting by the census date will be considered “Never Attended” and removed from the course.

Independent Study

Independent study is a class offered without any regularly scheduled conventional classroom or lab sessions and are used in extraordinary cases and when other alternatives, such as online, video conference, schedule modification, etc., are not available. Generally, independent study courses are used when students have an immediate need for a course in order to fulfill graduation requirements. Independent study classes are rare and must have the approval of the appropriate dean prior to the creation of the class.

Registration for the class should take place during regular semester registration. All independent study classes must be required or elective courses in the program of study. To request registration for an independent study class, complete the Independent Study Request form found in Student Forms. The meeting schedule is negotiated in advance of the course start date by faculty and student, and the total meeting hours must be at least one-third of the total contact hours of the course. The faculty member and student meet weekly throughout the semester to discuss/assess progress toward meeting the course learning outcomes and to conduct the course assessment. For example, during a 3-credit hour 16-week course, faculty and student would meet for one hour each week, resulting in a total of at least 16 hours meeting time. Course content, standards of progress, tuition and fee charges, and all other provisions heretofore presented will apply to independent study courses.

Experiential Learning

Experiential learning integrates classroom learning with practical work experience in a work setting related to each student’s program of study. Experiential learning opportunities include Work-Based Learning (WBL), Apprenticeship, Clinical courses/components, practicum courses/assignments, and Service Learning.

The objective of experiential learning is to expand the student’s learning environment into the workplace, providing opportunities to observe and apply the skills and knowledge learned in the classroom. Students will work under a structured learning plan and under the guidance of a designated supervisor at an approved work site.

To be eligible to participate in experiential learning, students must meet the following minimum guidelines:

  • Be enrolled in a course/program of study approved for experiential learning
  • Be in good academic standing as defined by a GPA of 2.0 or a GPA as otherwise indicated by the program of study
  • Have approval from their Dean and Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs/CAO or their designees

In the event a student’s behavior is not consistent with sound work practices and/or safety essential to the work site, the student may be removed from the work site by the on-site supervisor or the appropriate college official. Students who are removed from a work site for any reason may not be placed in another site without approval of the appropriate Dean and Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs/CAO.

Academic Advisors

Every curriculum student is assigned an academic advisor(s). The academic advisor is available to students during their regularly scheduled office hours as well as by appointment. Students have the responsibility for planning their program of study with the help of the academic advisor. Student planning is available in Self-Service under the “Student Planning” tab. This involves (1) keeping up to date with College and division/department curriculum requirements, (2) keeping informed of academic deadlines and changes in academic policies, and (3) consulting with the academic advisor at each pre-registration period and at other times as needed. Current students can locate their academic advisor in Aviso or Self-Service.

Academic Evaluations (EVAL)

A student’s academic evaluation identifies the course requirements for their program, indicates which courses have been completed, and reflects the GPA for the program of study (courses, grades, and quality points included in the program). Students may obtain an academic evaluation from their Go! Portal, their advisor, Student Affairs, or the Advising Center.

Changing or Adding a Program of Study

When students complete an application for admission to South Piedmont Community College, a program of study is selected or declared. To change this program of study or to add another program of study, students must complete the online Change of Program form or visit the Advising Center for assistance. Students may change their program only once per semester. Changing programs may result in loss of financial aid.

Students who seek a double major (dual program) and have a cumulative South Piedmont Community College GPA of at least 2.0 must first consult with their current program Academic Advisor. To identify the Academic Advisor, students may log into their Aviso or Self-Service account, which lists the Academic Advisor on the Home page. Cumulative GPA can also be found in Aviso under the Profile page and in Self-Service under Progress.

Collaborative Agreements

If a student is taking classes at South Piedmont Community College toward a degree which will be awarded by another community college, the student must meet the admissions and graduation requirements for that “host” college. Transcript evaluations will come from the host college. Most colleges will only accept 75 percent of the total program hours as transfer credit from another college. Check with the host college to find out their admissions, graduation, and transfer credit policies.

Course Substitution

Students may request to substitute an equal or higher-level course required in the program of study based on particular occupational goals. The exception is that substitutions are not allowed for a program’s core courses. Core courses are listed under “Major Hours - Core Courses” in the Programs section of this catalog. All substitutions must be approved by the student’s advisor, the appropriate dean, and the Registrar.

No course substitutions will be accepted if a student has not met SPCC’s prerequisite and/or corequisite for the required course.

A maximum of five (5) courses may be credited for any associate degree through course substitution, three (3) courses for diploma, and one (1) for certificate.

No course substitutions will be approved for CIS 110  and CIS 111 unless the North Carolina Community College System curriculum standard for the program allows for the substitution. Re-entering students must take ENG 111 ; no course substitutions for ENG 110 will be approved.

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites

Students must comply with regulations stipulating that courses may not be taken until all state and local prerequisites have been met. If dropping/withdrawing from a prerequisite course, the student will also be dropped/withdrawn from currently registered courses requiring the prerequisite. A corequisite course is a course that must be taken simultaneously with another course. If dropping/withdrawing from a corequisite course, the student must also drop/withdraw from the course requiring the corequisite.

Course Withdrawal

South Piedmont Community College recognizes that from time to time it may be necessary for a student to withdraw from a course. Students may withdraw from any course and receive a grade of “W” or “WE” after the class census date and through the 70 percent point of the session. Students can access the Withdrawal Form in Student Forms.

Before withdrawing from a course, be aware that course withdrawals:

  • May affect financial aid status
  • May affect transfer grade point average
  • May affect anticipated graduation date

After the 70 percent point of the session, if the student must withdraw from one or more classes, the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs may grant an administrative withdrawal. To petition for an administrative withdrawal after the 70 percent point of the session, the student must:

  • Submit an Administrative Withdrawal Request found in Student Forms.
  • Provide compelling and sufficient written documentation of the circumstances creating the need to withdraw.
  • Submit the completed request form along with documentation at least two (2) weeks before the end of classes for the semester in question.

In cases where the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs formally approves the withdrawal, a grade of “W” or “WE” will be assigned.

Students who withdraw through the 60 percent point of the semester and who are receiving federal financial aid (Title IV) are required to repay funds for which they are not eligible due to withdrawal.

Students who withdraw through the 35 percent point of the semester and who are receiving North Carolina financial aid are required to repay funds for which they are not eligible for due to withdrawal.

NOTE: If the course the student wishes to take has a prerequisite or a corequisite, the student is required to meet those course requirements. All prerequisites must have been satisfactorily completed before registering for the course. When withdrawing from a course with a corequisite, both the corequisite and the course requiring the corequisite must be withdrawn. If a student is preregistered for a course in which the requisite is required, the course requiring the requisite will also be dropped.

Course Repeat

In an effort to earn a higher grade and/or to enhance mastery of course content, students may repeat any curriculum course, but may not enroll in the same course more than two (2) times without approval of the Associate Vice President for Student Success. The Course Repeat Request form is found in Student Forms. Although all grades will appear on the transcript, only the highest grade will be counted toward the cumulative grade point average (GPA) at South Piedmont Community College.

The University of North Carolina System and other colleges and universities require that a grade of “C” or better be earned in each transfer course completed. If a student is planning to transfer, realize that receiving institutions do not have consistent policies regarding coursework that is repeated and may recalculate grade point averages to include the grade(s) originally assigned.

Certain regulations may prohibit veterans and other financial aid recipients from receiving educational benefits while repeating a course. It is the student’s responsibility to determine their status in regard to veterans benefits and financial aid.

If a student has been dismissed from (or have dropped out of) a program that requires specific admissions, (e.g. curriculum and continuing education health programs, BLET, etc.) they will not be permitted to repeat any course in that particular program without being officially accepted into that program.

Grades

The evaluation of each student’s coursework will be reflected in a final letter grade assigned by the instructor at the end of each semester or term. Grades will be posted in the Go Portal. The 4.0 quality point system is used to calculate the quality point averages. Quality points are the numerical equivalents of the letter grades and are used to determine academic honors. The letter grades used are:

Grade Rating Quality Points
(per credit hour)
A Excellent 4
B Good 3
C Average 2
D Below Average 1
F Failure 0
AP* Advanced Placement 0
AU* Audit 0
CC* Course Completion 0
CE* Credit by Examination 0
I/IE* Incomplete 0
NA* Never Attended 0
P* Passing 0
R* Re-Enroll 0
SR* Senior Citizen Audit 0
T* Transfer 0
TP* High School Articulated Credit 0
W/WE* Withdrawal 0
WI* Withdrawal by instructor 0

*These grades do not affect academic GPA, but may impact Satisfactory Academic Progress.

Grade Point Average (GPA)

GPA is a calculation of credits earned and grades received. The grade point average is calculated by dividing the total number of quality points earned by the total number of semester hours attempted. A minimum GPA of 2.0 in the program of study and overall is necessary to meet grade requirements for graduation.

Grade Forgiveness

Any returning student who has not attended South Piedmont Community College for five (5) years and upon re-enrolling maintains a 2.0 GPA for a minimum of 12 credit hours may petition to have grades on all prior coursework more than five (5) years old with a grade of less than “C” excluded in calculating the cumulative GPA.

  • These credits must not be required to satisfy any previous degree requirements.
  • Only prior courses with grades below a “C” are eligible for grade forgiveness.
  • Students must submit a Grade Forgiveness Request found in Student Forms.
  • Only one grade forgiveness request will be accepted. If the request is approved, the record of the earlier coursework remains on the transcript but is not calculated in the cumulative grade point average.
  • For instances in which grade forgiveness is granted for courses completed at South Piedmont Community College and then transferred to another college or university, the receiving institution may choose to disregard those course grades. Other colleges or universities may elect to include grades forgiven in computing the grade point average (GPA).

Academic Honors

Students enrolled in a curriculum program leading to a degree, a diploma, or a certificate, are eligible for an academic honors list. Non-degree seeking (special credit) students are not eligible for academic honors. Students who earn grades of “D,” “F,” “I”, or “IE” for the semester are also not eligible. Any repeated (coursework previously attempted), developmental education courses or earned grades of “W”, “WI”, or “WE”, will be excluded from the minimum semester hours.

  • Dean’s List: Students enrolled for a minimum of 12 credit hours in a given term in an approved curriculum and earn a 3.5 GPA or higher (but less than a 4.0 GPA) will be placed on the Dean’s List. Only courses at or above the 100 level are considered in calculating eligibility for academic honor.
  • President’s List: Students enrolled for a minimum of 12 credit hours in a given term in an approved curriculum and earn a 4.0 GPA will be placed on the President’s List. Only courses at or above the 100 level will be considered in calculating eligibility for academic honor.

Course Auditing

If a student wishes to attend classes regularly but does not want to take examinations or receive credit, the student may request to register as an auditor. If the course has requisites, then all requisites must be met before enrolling. A record of classes attended will be maintained. No credit is awarded for such courses and cannot be granted at a later date. A grade of “AU” will be assigned. Enrollment in a course for credit cannot be changed to audit after the class census date. The participation of auditors in class discussions or examinations is optional with the instructor. Student auditors are expected to pay regular tuition and fees for audited courses. Federal regulations do not allow financial aid for courses being audited.

Senior citizens who wish to register as an auditor must also meet all requirements of the course. A grade of “SR” will be assigned. Senior citizen student auditors are expected to pay for associated fees and textbooks for audited courses.

A student may audit a course based on space availability and shall not displace students enrolling or registering to receive a grade, academic credit, continuing education unit, or certificate of completion in the course section. Students who wish to register as an auditor should submit a Course Audit Request found in Student Forms. Approved forms will be processed by the Registrar’s Office.

Incompletes

An instructor may assign a grade of “I” or “IE” if a student is unable to complete all the requirements of a class, subject to the following conditions:

  • Student has regularly attended class.
  • Student has completed 75 percent of the class material with a passing average prior to assignment of the “I” or “IE.”
  • Circumstances beyond the student’s control interfere with the ability to complete the class by the last day of the semester or term.
  • There is reasonable expectation that the remaining work can be completed before the last day of classes of the following semester or term.

“I” or “IE” grades cannot be awarded if the student does not attend class, complete work, withdraw from the class, or request an “I” or “IE” to avoid receiving a failing grade.

If the conditions above are met and an incomplete in a class is sought, the student should discuss the appropriateness of an incomplete grade with the instructor and must submit an Incomplete Grade Request found in Student Forms. Incompletes must have approval of both the instructor and the department chair. If the work is not completed by the instructor’s required completion date, the “I” or “IE” is automatically converted to an “F.”

Appeal of Final Course Grade

Any student who believes that an instructor has unfairly assigned a final course grade may appeal using the procedure below. Failure to follow the procedure will result in forfeiture of the appeal. Students needing assistance in navigating the appeal procedure should contact the Director of Student Wellness and Advocacy for guidance.

  1. Any student wishing to appeal a grade must consult with the instructor issuing the grade within five (5) business days after the respective course grade is posted in the student Go! Portal located on the SPCC website. The consultation may be in person (on campus), by conference call (on the phone), or virtually (video conferencing with a call-in option). After the student has made a reasonable effort to contact the instructor and the instructor has not responded, the student should proceed to Step 2 and contact the supervisor of the respective division/department.
  2. If, after consultation with the instructor, the complaint is not resolved, the student should consult with the supervisor of the division/department in which the instructor taught the course for which the questioned grade was issued within 10 business days after the date the grade was posted in the student Go Portal located on the SPCC website. If the instructor is a division/department supervisor, the student should contact the Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs/Chief Academic Officer (CAO). The consultation may be in person, by conference call, or virtually.
  3. Should the matter remain unresolved after consulting with the supervisor, the student may file a Formal Appeal of a Final Course Grade if the appeal meets one of the three (3) criteria:
    1. policy and/or procedures were not followed, procedural irregularity that affected the outcome,
    2. evidence of a conflict of interest or bias that affected the outcome, or
    3. new evidence that was not reasonably available at the time of the determination that could affect the outcome.

This formal appeal must be received within fifteen (15) business days after the grade was originally posted in the student Go! Portal located on the SPCC website.

This appeal must be submitted through the Formal Final Course Grade Appeal located at www.spcc.edu under Student Panel/Appeal Forms. This must be completed in its entirety. All documentation supporting the reason for the appeal including emails, copies of graded work, syllabus, any corrective action being requested, etc., must be attached to the appeal form. Incomplete or insufficient documentation will forfeit the appeals process. (Students needing assistance with completing the form may contact the Director of Student Wellness and Advocacy) The student will receive notification of receipt of the appeal.

Once the appeal is received, the appeal is reviewed by the Associate Vice President of Student Affairs to ensure the reason for the appeal meets the criteria for an appeal. Requests that do not meet the criteria for an appeal may be denied without input from the Student Appeals Team. Requests that meet the criteria for an appeal are forwarded to the Student Appeals Team for a hearing.

  1. Within 10 business days of the receipt of the appeal, the Student Appeals Team will review the appeal. The student and the instructor will be notified of the date, time, and location of the hearing. The location will be in person (on campus), by conference call (on the phone), or virtually (video conferencing with a call-in option). Both parties may present pertinent information. At the discretion of the Student Appeals Team, other pertinent individuals may be contacted for additional information, either in person, by conference call, or virtually.
  2. The Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs/CAO will notify the student (by the student’s SPCC email) and the instructor (by SPCC email) on the decision of the appeal within five (5) business days after the review. The decision of the Student Appeals Team is final.

The Student Appeals Team is a standing team appointed by the Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs/CAO and will consist of five (5) voting members to include representatives from faculty, staff, and the student body. (The student representative will be selected from a pool of student leaders within the college.)

Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure

SPCC’s Academic Integrity Policy and accompanying procedure address student rights and responsibilities regarding academic dishonesty. This policy applies to all students, including those in distance learning courses and programs.

Students enrolled at South Piedmont Community College are responsible for upholding standards of academic integrity. An academic integrity violation includes, but is not limited to the following: cheating, plagiarism, fabrication/falsification, and complicity in academic dishonesty.

Cheating: An attempt to use or actual use of unauthorized materials in any format to complete an academic exercise. Cheating also includes the communication of unauthorized information during an academic activity or exercise.

  • Cheating includes, but is not limited to:
    • copying another student’s homework, class work, or required project (in part or in whole) and presenting it to the instructor as one’s own work; or
    • giving, receiving, offering, and/or soliciting information on a quiz, test, examination, or other academic exercise; or,
    • Use of third-party sites or technology such as AI generators to create or present material as your own in whole or in part during an academic activity or exercise constitues cheating, unless the use of such technology and/or third party sites is expressly permitted by the instructor.

Plagiarism: The copying of any published work such as books, magazines, audiovisual programs, electronic media, and films or copying the theme or manuscript of another individual. It is plagiarism when one uses direct quotations without proper credit or when one uses the ideas of another without giving proper credit. When three (3) or more consecutive words are borrowed, the borrowing should be recognized according to the conventions appropriate for the assignment (APA style, MLA style, etc).

  • Use of third-party sites or technology such as AI generators to create or preswent material as your own in whole orin part during an academic activity or exercise constitutes plagiarism, unless the use of such technology and/or thirt-party sites is expressly permitted by the instructor.

Self-plagiarism: The unauthorized use of one’s own previous work without the express permission of both the instructor to whom the previous work was submitted and the instructor to whom the work currently is being submitted.

Fabrication/falsification: An attempt to deceive the instructor in their effort to fairly evaluate an academic exercise. Fabrication/falsification may include presenting dishonest information related to an academic activity or exercise; or creation of or altering information or citations related to an academic activity or exercise.

Complicity: Complicity in academic dishonesty refers to intentionally giving unauthorized assistance to someone else who engages in academic dishonesty.

It is the student’s responsibility to learn more about how to avoid academic dishonesty.

II- INVESTIGATION

If upon investigation the instructor determines there is an academic integrity violation, the student will be held accountable as stated below:

  1. The instructor, after consulting with their supervisor, will notify the student in writing of the details of the academic integrity violation, which may include a formal warning, a reduced grade on an assignment, or a reduced grade in the course.
  2. The instructor will send the student’s name along with detailed evidence and documentation of the violation to their supervisor, Dean, and the Academic and Student Affairs Administrative Assistant to be added to the student’s permanent academic record.
  3. The Academic and Student Affairs Administrative Assistant will notify the appropriate Dean if there are previous documented offenses in the student’s file. The Dean will determine the disciplinary action for the violation. Sanctions range from the minimum of a reprimand to a maximum of suspension depending on the severity and number of violations.
  4. The Dean will notify the student in writing electronically of the disciplinary action for the violation. Notification will be sent to the student’s college email address. A copy of the disciplinary action letter will be sent to the Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs/CAO, and the Academic and Student Affairs Administravie Assistant to be added to the student’s permanent academic record.

Appeal of Academic Integrity Violation

Students may appeal the academic integrity violation and/or the disciplinary action resulting from the violation, if the reason for the appeal meets one of the following: policy and/or procedure were not followed or procedural irregularity that affected the outcome; sanction too severe for the charge; evidence of a conflict of interest or bias that affected the outcome; or, new evidence that was not reasonably available at the time of the determination that could affect the outcome. Students should appeal using the procedure below. Failure to follow the procedure will result in forfeiture of the appeal. Students needing assistance in navigating the appeal procedure should contact the Director of Student Wellness and Advocacy for guidance. Once the appeal is received, the appeal is reviewed by the Associate Vice President of Student Affairs to ensure the reason for the appeal meets the criteria for an appeal. Requests that do not meet the criteria for an appeal may be denied without input from the Student Appeals Team. Requests that meet the criteria for an appeal are forwarded to the Student Appeals Team for a hearing.

  1. A formal appeal of the academic integrity violation and/or the disciplinary action must be received within five (5) business days after the notification to the student of the violation. This appeal must be submitted through the Formal Academic Integrity Appeal form located on the College’s website at www.spcc.edu under Student Panel/Appeal Forms. This form must be completed in its entirety. All documentation supporting the reason for the appeal, including emails, any corrective action being requested, etc., must be attached to the appeal form. Incomplete or insufficient documentation will forfeit the appeals process. (Students needing assistance with completing the form may contact the Director of Student  Wellness and Advocacy.) The student will receive notification of receipt of the appeal.
  2. Within 10 business days of receipt of the appeal, the Student Appeals Team will review the appeal through a hearing. The student and the instructor will be notified of the date, time, and location of the hearing. The location may be in person (on campus), by conference call (on the phone), or virtually (video conferencing with a call-in option). Both parties may present pertinent information. At the discretion of the Student Appeals Team, other pertinent individuals may be contacted for additional information, either in person, by conference call or virtually.
    1. The appeal meeting is a conflict resolution and not a judicial proceeding.
    2. The student may not record this meeting but may take notes.
  3. The Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs/CAO will notify the student (by student SPCC email) and the instructor (by SPCC email) of the decision on the appeal within five (5) business days after the review. The decision of the Student Appeals Team is final.

The Student Appeals Team is a standing team appointed by the Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs/CAO and will consist of five (5) voting members to include representatives from faculty, staff, and the student body. (The student representative will be selected from a pool of student leaders within the college.)

Academic Standards Policy

Students must maintain satisfactory academic standards. Academic evaluation of student performance occurs at the end of each semester. Minimum satisfactory academic performance is defined as maintaining a cumulative Grade-Point Average (GPA) of at least 2.0 (a grade of “C”).

Academic Intervention

Students’ academic progress is reviewed each semester. The first semester a student earns a grade point average below a cumulative minimum of 2.0, the student will be placed on academic intervention. Academic intervention status will not limit the number of hours a student may take during that semester; however, the student is encouraged to meet with a counselor to complete an academic success plan. The student will have one semester to meet the required 2.0 cumulative GPA. Failure to do so will result in being placed on academic probation.

Academic Probation

The second and all subsequent semesters a student has a grade point average below the minimum 2.0 required for the cumulative hours attempted for their current major, the student will be placed on academic probation. During the academic probation period, the student’s hours will be limited, and the student will meet with a counselor to register for classes and create an academic success plan. Failure to meet the required 2.0 grade point average during the probationary semester may result in one or more of the following:

  • An additional semester of academic probation
  • Limited academic course load and counseling
  • Loss of financial aid; refer to Section III, Satisfactory Academic Progress for Students Receiving Financial Aid for additional requirements
  • Loss of VA educational benefits; refer to Section III, Satisfactory Academic Progress for Students Receiving Financial Aid for additional requirements
  • Academic suspension for a semester or more (students suspended for academic reasons will automatically be placed on probation for their first returning semester; refer to Academic Suspension below for further information)
  • Other as defined by the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs

Academic Suspension

Under academic suspension, students:

  • Are officially prohibited from enrolling in credit courses at South Piedmont Community College for at least one semester (fall, spring, or summer)
  • May register only for continuing education courses at SPCC
  • Must submit a letter requesting readmission to the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs
  • If permitted to return, will be readmitted on academic probation. Under this status, students must meet with a counselor to complete an academic plan and obtain the counselor’s approval of their proposed course schedules before registering for the next semester.
  • Must achieve a minimum 2.0 GPA for each semester. If students do not achieve a semester GPA of 2.0 while on probation following a suspension, they again may be placed on Academic Suspension.
  • When students’ cumulative GPA is at least 2.0, they will return to Good Academic Standing.

Students may appeal the decision of the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs by notifying the Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs/CAO no later than five (5) days following the notification of suspension status. The Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs/CAO will appoint a Student Appeals Team to conduct a hearing.

The Student Appeals Team is a standing team appointed by the Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs/CAO and will consist of five (5) voting members to include representatives from faculty, staff, and the student body. (The student representative will be selected from a pool of student leaders within the college.)

Appeal for Program Dismissal Procedure

Students who have been dismissed from an academic program due to reasons other than charges of a violation of academic integrity and/or a final grade may appeal using the procedure below if the reason for the appeal meets one of the following:

  1. policy and/or procedures were not followed, procedural irregularity that affected the outcome,
  2. sanction too severe for the charge,
  3. evidence of a conflict of interest or bias that affected the outcome, or
  4. new evidence that was not reasonably available at the time of the determination that could affect the outcome.

Students should appeal using the procedures below. Failure to follow the procedure will result in forfeiture of the appeal. Students needing assistance in navigating the appeal procedure should contact the Director of Student Wellness and Advocacy for guidance.

Once the appeal is received, the appeal is reviewed by the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs to ensure the reason for the appeal meets the criteria for an appeal. Requests that do not meet the criteria for an appeal may be denied without input from the Student Appeals Team. Requests that meet the criteria for an appeal are forwarded to the Student Appeals Team for a hearing.

  1. A formal appeal of the program dismissal must be received within three (3) business days after the dismissal. This appeal must be submitted through the Formal Appeal for Program Dismissal located at www.spcc.edu, under Student Panel, Appeal Forms. This form must be completed in its entirety. All documentation supporting the reason for the appeal, including emails, any corrective action being requested, etc., must be attached to the appeal form. Incomplete or insufficient documentation will forfeit the appeals process. (Students needing assistance with completing the form may contact the Director of Student Wellness and Advocacy.) The student will receive notification of receipt of the appeal.
    1. Upon the receipt of the appeal, the student will be placed on the status of dismissal pending. While in this status, the student may not attend any program activities (classroom, clinical, lab or club activities).
  2. Within three (3) business days of the receipt of the appeal, the Student Appeals Team will review the appeal. The student and the instructor will be notified of the date, time, and location of the hearing. The location may be in person (on campus), by conference call (on the phone), or virtually (video conferencing with a call-in option). Both parties may present pertinent information. At the discretion of the Student Appeals Team, other pertinent individuals may be contacted for additional information, either in person, by conference call or virtually.
    1. The appeal meeting is a conflict resolution and not a judicial proceeding. The student may not record this meeting but may take notes.
  3. The Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs/CAO will notify the student (by student SPCC email) and the instructor (by SPCC email) of the decision on the appeal within three (3) business days after the review. The decision of the Student Appeals Team is final.

The Student Appeals Team is a standing team appointed by the Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs/CAO and will consist of five (5) voting members to include representatives from faculty, staff, and the student body. (The student representative will be selected from a pool of student leaders within the college.)

High Impact Programs

The Association of American Colleges and Universities has identified teaching and learning practices that result in academic challenge, student engagement, and “deep learning” as High Impact Educational Programs (Kuh, 2008). These high-impact practices are the foundation of SPCC’s High Impact Programs: ePortfolio, Global Scholars of Distinction, College Honors, Service Learning, Learning Communities, Undergraduate Research, and Capstone Experiences. Assessment of these active learning practices reveals their effectiveness in measuring student learning over time.

SP ePortfolio

Students in the School of Arts and Sciences complete ePortfolios, which are web-based collections of their best academic work. Assignments from courses across the curriculum are selected to demonstrate their learning. Students learn how to present themselves in a professional manner for employment or university transfer. For information, email the Director of Academic Enrichment Programs, Tammy Frailly, at tfrailly@spcc.edu.

SP Global Scholars of Distinction

Global Scholars of Distinction is an academic program that provides SPCC students with global competencies and skills needed for employment and university transfer. Affiliated with UNC’s World View program, NC Global Distinction Initiative, students complete 15 hours of globally focused courses and experience co-curricular activities on campus and in the community. Students create and present a capstone project on a global, international, or intercultural issue. With SPCC’s Study Abroad Program, students have opportunities for international travel and learning.

Students in any SPCC degree program with a GPA of 2.5 or higher may participate in Global Scholars. Upon completing the program, students will receive the Global Scholars of Distinction notation on their transcripts, a certificate of completion from UNC Chapel Hill, and graduation honors. For information on Global Scholars of Distinction, email the Director of Academic Enrichment Programs, Tammy Frailly, at tfrailly@spcc.edu.

SP College Honors

The SP Honors Program provides an intellectually challenging curriculum for high-achieving students in any degree program. Honors option courses enrich traditional college coursework by offering additional opportunities for critical thinking, communication, information and technology literacy, academic integrity, and social responsibility.

The benefits of the Honors program include articulation agreements with Wingate University, Appalachian State University, UNC Greensboro, Mars Hill University, Western Carolina University, and UNC Asheville; potential transfer of Honors credits to additional four-year institutions; presentation opportunities at the NC Honors Association Conference, National Collegiate Honors Association, and symposiums; documentation on their SPCC transcript; and honors cords. For information, email the Coordinator of College Honors and Undergraduate Research, Katherine Widner, at kwidner@spcc.edu.

SP Service Learning

This program combines traditional classroom instruction with the opportunity for students to apply their learning by providing services to the community. The projects integrate practical, hands on experience with reflective practice to offer enhanced personal and professional growth. The program gives students the chance to serve the community and earn college credit at the same time. Students may also participate in the community based service option by completing 30 hours of community service. For information, email the Director of Academic Enrichment Programs, Tammy Frailly, at tfrailly@spcc.edu.

SP Learning Communities

Students in learning communities take two (2) or more courses together and meet regularly to discuss course topics and interdisciplinary connections. Professors mentor students and encourage students to question. Students are challenged to apply their learning in and outside the classroom with practices such as common readings, community-based service, professional topics, and undergraduate research.

  • The First Year Experience (FYE) at SPCC is a learning community designed to help students make a smooth transition to college. The FYE program includes workshops and events throughout the year to help students connect with college resources, excel in classes, and get comfortable on campus. The FYE program provides students with what is needed to succeed during their first year at SPCC. For information, email the Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, Dr. Diane Paige, at dpaige@spcc.edu.
  • South Piedmont’s Pre-Honors Program is a learning community open to all students who are interested in exploring the path to Honors. The program includes information on the Honors Program, the creation of personalized projects, meetings with faculty mentors, undergraduate research, curricular, and co-curricular experiences. For information, email the Coordinator of College Honors and Undergraduate Research, Katherine Widner, at kwidner@spcc.edu.
  • The Associate in Arts in a Year Program is an affordable, customized, and efficient opportunity to earn an AA degree in one year. In this learning community, students take a year of classes with the same groups of students which allows them to support each other and form meaningful bonds. For information, email the Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, Dr. Diane Paige, at dpaige@spcc.edu.

Undergraduate Research

Undergraduate research introduces students to the exciting world of inquiry and analysis. Students ask and investigate questions that are important to their studies or careers, so the research is relevant to them. Learning communities, faculty mentoring, presentations, and/or publication opportunities assist in the development of their skills. For information, email the Coordinator of College Honors and Undergraduate Research, Katherine Widner, at kwidner@spcc.edu.

Capstone Experiences

In the School of Arts and Sciences, students enroll in one of three (3) capstone courses: ART 214 - Portfolio and Resume , HUM 110 - Technology and Society , or HUM 115 - Critical Thinking , depending on their major program.

Students take a capstone course to reflect on their learning experiences while in their transfer program. They learn how to create an ePortfolio, or learning website, in one of their first courses at the college and complete it toward the end of their program. This website demonstrates their academic and personal knowledge by using college assignments to document their learning over time. ePortfolios demonstrate common skills for transfer as well as program-specific skills.

Requirements for Graduation

South Piedmont Community College ensures all graduates of its degree and diploma programs have achieved competence in reading, writing, oral communication, fundamental mathematical skills, and basic use of computers.

Degree, Diploma, and Certificate Requirements

For most programs, a student is eligible for graduation when they have satisfied the specific requirements of the college and the program for which they are enrolled, completed a minimum of 25 percent of the credit hours required in residence at SPCC, and have earned at least a 2.0 program and overall GPA. Students accepted into programs with competitive entrance requirements may have to meet other graduation criteria.

Students wishing to earn more than one (1) associate degree at the college must complete at least 12 distinct hours in courses taken at SPCC that are not being used towards another degree.

Students enrolled in a degree or diploma may automatically be eligible for graduation in lower level diploma and certificate programs.

A continuously enrolled student may graduate using the catalog under which they initially enrolled or the current catalog (the advising center can help update a catalog year). A student’s record will be made inactive if they do not enroll for two (2) consecutive semesters (summer term excluded). If a student’s record is made inactive, the catalog year will be updated based on the semester the student returns.

Students are responsible for ensuring that they have met all program and course requirements to earn their degree, diploma, and/or certificate.

Graduation Eligibility Notification

Students who meet graduation eligibility requirements will be notified of their pending graduation through their South Piedmont Community College student email account. Any student who believes they are eligible for graduation, but has not received notification after midterm, should contact the Registrar’s Office.

Students completing their program of study in the summer term must be enrolled in their final courses by April 1 to ensure their eligibility to participate in the spring commencement ceremony.

Upon receiving the graduation eligibility notification email from the Registrar’s Office, students will be directed to complete the required Graduation Application form in Student Forms. This form must be submitted by April 1 to have the student’s name printed in the spring commencement program.

Courses withdrawn or failed may change program status and graduation eligibility.

Distribution of Degrees, Diplomas, and Certificates

Degrees, diplomas, and certificates are not given out at the commencement ceremony. The Registrar’s Office completes graduation processes and prints credentials within six (6) weeks after final grades have been posted and final evaluations are complete. Before requesting final transcripts, students should check to make sure their graduation has been posted. 

Students should complete the Graduation Application found in Student Forms to specify the spelling of their name to be printed on their credential and to verify their correct contact information. Students will be notified when their award is available for pickup. The current information on file will be used if updates are not received. Unclaimed awards will be shredded after 90 days. Replacement awards are $5 each.

Any changes that need to be made after the Graduation Application form has been submitted should be emailed to the Registrar’s Office at registrar@spcc.edu. 

Students must have:

  • Earned a 2.0 GPA (grade point average) in major and an overall 2.0 GPA
  • Completed all required courses in their program of study
  • Satisfied all division or departmental requirements
  • Met residency requirements for graduation
  • Returned all property of the College: library books, videos, tapes, etc.
  • Paid all fees due to the College
  • Paid graduation fee
  • Ordered cap and gown (if participating in commencement)

Commencement exercises will be conducted at the end of spring semester for students who will complete all coursework by the end of summer term. This includes courses taken at other colleges during the summer term. Upon completion of courses taken at other colleges during the summer term, students must submit official transcripts to the SPCC Registrar’s Office, PO Box 126, Polkton, NC 28135, for immediate evaluation. Award availability will be delayed if official transcripts are not received. 

Graduation for students who are completing requirements from a previous incomplete will be based on the completion date. The actual date of SPCC graduation will be as follows:

  • First day of term for completion date between terms.
  • Mid-term for completion date between first day of term and mid-term.
  • Last day of term for completion date between mid-term and last day of term.

Graduation for students who are completing high school requirements will be based on the high school graduation date. The actual date of SPCC graduation for high school students will be as follows:

  • First day of term for Official High School transcript graduation dates between terms.
  • Mid-term for Official High School transcript graduation dates between first day of term and mid-term.
  • Last day of term for Official High School transcript graduation dates between mid-term and last day of term.

Students who have taken classes at South Piedmont Community College toward a degree which will be awarded by another college must meet the graduation requirements of that college.

Residency Requirement for Graduation Policy

To graduate from SPCC, students must complete a minimum of 25 percent of the credit hours required for a degree, diploma, or certificate in residence at SPCC. In meeting this requirement, students must complete at least 25 percent of the credit hours in the respective program (excluding general education requirements) at SPCC, unless otherwise approved by the College.

Examples of credits that do not meet the 25 percent requirement include, but are not limited to: transfer, credit by exam, articulated credit, AP, CLEP, or other forms of credits that do not involve SPCC curriculum course completion. Students changing programs at SPCC must meet the 25 percent requirement for the new program of study. Students may be required to repeat coursework for credit.

SPCC Graduation/Persistence Rates

Information regarding the persistence rates relative to degree completion of students at South Piedmont Community College is available on the SPCC website under Consumer Information, https://spcc.edu/consumer-info/.

Honor Graduates

Students who receive an associate degree and have a grade point average of 3.5 or higher in their major will have honors noted on their degree. Honor graduates must have completed at least one-half (50 percent) of the credit hours required for a degree from South Piedmont Community College.

Graduates of Excellence

The Graduates of Excellence program annually honors four (4) outstanding graduates for their academic achievement, college and community leadership, and service to professional organizations. These graduates demonstrate the qualities necessary for a successful future and serve as role models for their colleagues.

Reverse Transfer

The Reverse Transfer Program is a collaborative effort between North Carolina’s Community Colleges and the University of North Carolina’s 16 constituent institutions, as well as an agreement with the National Student Clearinghouse.

Students who transfer from one of the 58 North Carolina community colleges to a North Carolina university or an accredited four-year institution are given the opportunity to combine the credits earned at the university with credits previously earned at the community college to determine if the associate degree requirements have been met.

Twice a year, community colleges will evaluate transcripts received from the universities and inform students if an associate degree has been earned. If an associate degree is awarded, the community college will send details on how to obtain a printed diploma to the student’s university email.

To graduate from SPCC, students must meet residency and minimum GPA requirements for graduation. A minimum of 25 percent of the credit hours in the respective program must be completed at SPCC with a minimum 2.0 GPA (grade point average) in major and an overall 2.0 GPA.

Students who would like to participate in the reverse transfer program should contact a transfer counselor at their university. Students may also visit the University of North Carolina Reverse Transfer Program or the National Student Clearinghouse for complete details.

Short Term and Continuing Education

Short Term and Continuing Education offers to any adult, regardless of educational background, an opportunity to continue the lifelong learning process through a wide variety of programs designed to meet the needs and interests of the citizens of Anson and Union counties. With the world of knowledge constantly growing and yesterday’s education so quickly becoming obsolete, continuing education is a must. Some courses are offered on a continuing basis. Others may begin as a result of requests from groups or individuals.

Admission Requirements

SPCC’s main purpose is to serve students who have graduated from high school, have obtained a high school equivalency diploma, or are beyond the compulsory age limit of the public high school. Therefore, admission is open for adults 18 years of age or older. However, students younger than 18 years of age may enroll under certain circumstances.

Class Locations

Classes are held both on campus and off-campus, as well as online. Morning, afternoon, evening, and weekend classes are offered.

Fees

  • Fees vary with the type of course offered.
  • Registration fees must be paid at the time or before the first class session.
  • Books and supplies are not included in the registration fee (unless noted).

Short Term and Non-credit Refund Policy

Registration fee refunds are not issued except under certain conditions. See Short Term and Non-credit Refund Policy in the Registering and Paying for Courses  section.

Enrollment

Typically, in order for most courses to be offered at a physical location, a minimum number of students must enroll. South Piedmont Community College reserves the right to cancel any course when an insufficient number of students enroll for that course.

Grades

Grades for Continuing Education courses are either “satisfactory” or “unsatisfactory” based on attendance (70 percent) and participation. Some courses require a minimum performance level as required by state or credentialing agencies. Information on specific program requirements for Short Term and Continuing Education courses can be found on the SPCC website.

Certificates

Certificates are awarded upon completion of certain courses when attendance requirements of the course have been met and satisfactory progress has been demonstrated.

Industrial and Professional Certification Courses

Through Community Education and Professional Development programs, South Piedmont Community College provides courses designed to meet the needs of business, industry, government, and associations. Programs are developed to fit specific needs in a wide range of subjects at convenient sites.

Examples of courses include Notary Public, Phlebotomy, Vehicle Safety/Vehicle Emissions Inspection Licensing, Welding, EMT Paramedic, and more located in the Short Term and Continuing Education  section.

Protective Services

The College offers continuous training to law enforcement personnel, emergency medical personnel, and fire fighters who provide protective and emergency services for their communities. These courses provide the opportunity to gain technical information and skills through a variety of technical and practical learning experiences which lead to certification in North Carolina. Law enforcement officers, paid and volunteer fire fighters, and certified Emergency Medical personnel are exempt from the tuition fee for Emergency Services Classes.

Firefighter Training

Basic and continuing training for firefighters is provided through SPCC in cooperation with local municipal and volunteer departments. Students must be a member of a fire department to participate in training for firefighting.

Firefighter Certification classes start in January and end in December of each year. Students who successfully complete each class will be certified as a Firefighter II by the state of North Carolina. Throughout the year specialty classes are also conducted as requested by local departments.

Corporate safety training is available for local companies. Classes include but are not limited to CPR, Automatic External Defibrillator (AED), Basic First Aid, Fire Extinguishers, and Active Shooter Safety.

In-Service Law Enforcement Training

Continuing Education courses offered for certified law enforcement personnel are designed to help improve training as well as maintain state and national certifications. These courses are offered both as seated and on-line for agencies throughout the service area.

Personal Interest

A variety of personal interest classes are offered at SPCC. These in-person classes are designed for personal enrichment and social engagement. Topics include but are not limited to Motorcycle Basic Rider and Photography. Information on these courses and new offerings can be found on the SPCC Short Term and Continuing Education web page. Online personal interest classes can also be found on the website in the Online Training Center.

Business Solutions (Economic And Workforce Development)

South Piedmont Community College is committed to providing training that will attract and retain jobs in Anson and Union Counties. The Business Solutions group is comprised of programs focused on meeting the immediate and future needs of the businesses that we serve. The Apprenticeship Program, Corporate Education, Small Business and Entrepreneurship, and Work-Based Learning all focus on the economic growth in our community and meaningful opportunities for our students.

Apprenticeship Program

Apprenticeship programs, registered through ApprenticeshipNC, consist of extensive on-the-job training coupled with related college courses delivered by South Piedmont Community College. Apprenticeship programs provide immediate results with a proven means of recruiting and developing talented employees for highly skilled positions that can otherwise be difficult to fill. South Piedmont assists local companies in registering their own apprenticeship programs and provides related instruction for those programs. South Piedmont also has registered apprenticeship programs that local companies can utilize without the need to register their own.

Once hired by a partnering company, an apprentice has the opportunity to learn in demand skills in the classroom as well as on the job. In addition to receiving a free education, the apprentice has the ability to earn a wage while learning a valuable skill set.

Customized Training Program

South Piedmont Community College’s Customized Training Program supports the economic and workforce development efforts of Anson and Union Counties and the State, by providing tailored training opportunities for eligible businesses and industries. The College recognizes that every organization has unique needs. With those needs in mind, the College works with organizations to build a solution-based training project to help continuously improve processes, comply to industry and safety regulations, and help new and existing leaders build a stronger workforce.

The Customized Training Program was developed by the NC Community College System in recognition of one of the most important factors for a business or industry considering locating, expanding, or remaining in North Carolina - the ability of the State to ensure the presence of a well-trained workforce. The program is designed to react quickly to the needs of businesses and to respect the confidential nature of proprietary processes and information within those businesses.

Small Business Center

The Small Business Center at South Piedmont Community College is a community-based resource, available to assist those individuals who want to start a small business or receive help with an existing business. The Center offers classes and seminars on a variety of topics to help entrepreneurs get started properly and successfully manage their business.

Seminar topics include:

  • How to Write a Business Plan
  • Financing Your Business
  • Marketing Your Business
  • Basics of Bookkeeping
  • Small Business Taxes

REAL (Rural Entrepreneurship through Action Learning), offered through the Small Business Center, is a hands-on entrepreneurship course. Students gain entrepreneurial knowledge and experience through hands-on participation in class exercises. The REAL course helps prepare prospective business owners for success, as well as those already in business looking to enhance their operations.

In addition to education and training, the Small Business Center offers confidential counseling to prospective or current business owners. The Center also maintains a resource library of materials and computers available to access online resources. The library is open during College operating hours. These services are offered free of charge. Some seminars and classes may require a fee.

Continuing Education Unit (CEU)

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, the accrediting body for South Piedmont Community College, has recommended that the Continuing Education Unit (CEU) be used as the basic instrument of measurement for student participation in non-credit courses and programs.

A CEU is defined as “10 contact hours of participation in an organized continuing education experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction, and qualified instruction.” For example, a course that meets for 20 hours and complies with the CEU guidelines would offer two (2) CEUs.

Course Criteria for Awarding a CEU

A course plan must include dates, times, and hours met; course description; course objectives; a topical outline; methods of evaluation (tests, attendance, etc.); instructional supplies and equipment needs; student supply needs; and the CEU value.

Instructor Criteria for Awarding a CEU

Competence in the subject matter must be illustrated by academic training which is supported by official transcripts and/or experiential documentation; by demonstration to the satisfaction of the program director of the competence of the instructor to teach the subject matter; and by demonstration to the satisfaction of the program director of the ability to communicate clearly.

Records for CEUs

At the completion of the CEU-awarding activity, the instructor or program director will indicate on the final roster the CEU status for each student. If students have met the pre-stated criteria for the class, an “S” for satisfactory completion will be indicated on this roster. This information will be recorded on the College’s computerized records for permanent retrieval available to students upon request.

Transcripts

South Piedmont Community College transcripts may be requested online through Parchment, our online transcript services provider. An official South Piedmont Community College transcript will be issued and will contain the following information:

  • Name and address of the College
  • Student name
  • Titles of all courses taken
  • Start and end dates of each course taken
  • Number of CEUs awarded, if applicable
  • Successful or unsuccessful assessment, if applicable

College and Career Readiness

The school of College and Career Readiness strives to assist each learner with the skills necessary to enter and thrive in today’s workforce and/or higher education opportunities. Departments include: Adult Basic Skills, Human Resources Development, Correctional Education Programs, Literacy Services, and Testing Services.

Adult Basic Skills (ABS)

The mission of the Adult Basic Skills program is to provide a positive educational experience that enhances the lives and well-being of adult learners, assists with transitions to post-secondary education, and develops the skills and knowledge necessary to enter and thrive in today’s workforce. Classes provide educational opportunities for adult learners to improve reading, writing, mathematics, and communication skills through specialized programs targeted to specific populations. These programs include:

High School Equivalency
Adult High School
English for Speakers of Other Languages
Compass Education

Classes are free and open to adults living or working in Anson or Union counties and the surrounding area.

For enrollment purposes, placement testing and orientation sessions are generally held on our Lockhart- Taylor Center (Anson County) and our Old Charlotte Highway Campus (Union County). These sessions are required for entry into any of our Adult Basic Skills programs. Enrollment is available during the spring, summer, and fall semesters. To inquire about classes or enrollment, please call 704-290-5243.

Admission Requirements

  • Students must be 18 years of age to enroll. Minor students (16 and 17 years of age) are allowed to enroll under special circumstances.
  • Placement testing and orientation is required for all new and returning students.

Class Locations

  • Morning, afternoon, and evening classes are offered at our Old Charlotte Highway Campus and Tyson Family Center for Technology in Monroe and at our Lockhart-Taylor Center in Wadesboro.
  • Virtual class options are available in all program areas.
  • Weekend course offerings and off-campus community classes are offered in both Anson and Union counties. Please call 704-290-5243 for specific locations.

Fees

  • Instruction is provided free of charge to all eligible participants.
  • Books and study materials are provided free of charge to all participants.
  • Students interested in taking one of the High School Equivalency tests administered at SPCC will pay associated testing fees or qualifying students may access scholarship funding as available. Testing fees vary and are determined by GED®Testing Service (GED®) and by PSI® High School Equivalency Test (HiSET®). Testing fees are not required for enrollment in classes.

Enrollment

To enroll in South Piedmont Community College’s Adult Basic Skills program, potential students must be able to complete a National Reporting System (NRS) approved pre-assessment. To remain enrolled, students must demonstrate the ability to benefit from the program as outlined by state and federal regulations. For more information, please read our Ability to Benefit Policy.

High School Equivalency (HSE)

The High School Equivalency program offers reading, writing, mathematics, critical thinking, and communication instruction to prepare learners to successfully pass either of the following nationally recognized high school equivalency assessments:

  • GED® - A computer-based test offered through SPCC’s Testing Center on our Old Charlotte Highway Campus (Union County) and our L.L. Polk Campus (Anson County). For more information regarding the GED® test, please visit www.ged.com.
  • HiSET® - A paper-based or computer-based test offered through SPCC’s Testing Center on our Old Charlotte Highway Campus (Union County) and our Lockhart-Taylor Center (Anson County). For more information regarding the HiSET® test, please visit www.hiset.org.

Upon completion of either HSE test battery, students will receive an HSE diploma issued from the state of North Carolina. For further information regarding HSE, please call 704-290-5243.

Adult High School (AHS)

Adult High School is an Adult Basic Skills program in which students complete the individual credits necessary to fulfill the North Carolina Future-Ready Core diploma requirements. Students’ high school transcripts are evaluated at program entry and credit is awarded for units previously earned. An individualized, competency-based program of study is designed for each student enrolled in the AHS program. Once the student completes all required credits, an AHS diploma will be awarded by SPCC in cooperation with the local public school system. For further information regarding the AHS program, please call 704-290-5243.

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)/English Language Acquisition (ELA)

The ESOL/ELA program provides academic opportunities for non-native English speakers who are learning to communicate in the English language. Leveled classes focus on improving conversation, reading, writing, and listening skills.

Students may also prepare for United States citizenship through our ESOL civics classes. Class content includes U.S. history and government, completing the N-400 application, and preparing for the USCIS oral interview. For further information regarding our ESOL/ELA program, please call 704-290-5243.

Compass Education

Compass Education is an Adult Basic Skills program for adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities designed to provide the academic and soft skills necessary to transition to a higher level of education and/or employment. The focus of the program is to help learners reach their full potential as independent, self-directed adults. For further information, please call 704-290-5813.

Human Resources Development (HRD)

The Human Resources Development program is designed to educate and train students for success in the workplace. The primary objective of the training component is to help orient students to the world of work, appreciate the effects of their behavior on others, and develop the basic academic and communication skills prerequisite to obtaining and maintaining employment.

Class time is devoted to assessment of student assets and challenges; development of a positive selfconcept; development of employability, communication, and problem-solving skills; and development of an awareness of the impact of information technology in the workplace. Students will study employer/employee relations, communication skills, pre-employment and job search skills, as well as application and interview techniques.

Career counseling is provided throughout the HRD program. Student referrals are made to other programs or support services when necessary.

Admission and Fees

The NC State Board of Community Colleges grants permission to waive tuition for HRD classes for individuals who meet one of the four (4) criteria listed below:

  • Unemployed
  • Have received notification of a pending layoff
  • Working and eligible for the Federal Earned Income Tax Credit
  • Working and earning wages at or below two hundred percent (200%) of the federal poverty guidelines

To receive this waiver, students must verify they meet the criteria by completing and signing a Tuition and Fee Waiver Verification Form. If students do not sign the form or do not meet one of the four (4) criteria, payment of the HRD registration fee is required. For additional information, please call 704-290-5216.

Correctional Education

In partnership with the North Carolina Department of Adult Corrections (NCDAC), South Piedmont’s Correctional Education Department provides on-site educational opportunities for students at area correctional institutions. The Department also provides regional training opportunities for NCDAC officers and staff, including probation/parole officers and Human Resource Training staff. For additional information, please call 704-272-5424.

Literacy Services

Literacy Services provides one-on-one or small group tutoring sessions for adult learners who seek to improve reading, writing, math, or English language skills. Upon enrollment, students will be matched with a Literacy Services tutor who will meet with the student weekly at SPCC or another community location in Anson or Union counties. For additional information, please call 704-290-5261.